Cultural Heritage Archive

Category: Heritage Homes


Beaver Lodge

 To hear the podcast, click here.

Built and owned by the Luxton family, Beaver Lodge has been home to hundreds. This eight-bedroom log structure is representative of typical early Banff rooming houses. The rustic detail of the log exterior, varnished wood interiors and minimal alterations make this structure a fine example of a building style once common in Banff. The Beaver Lodge cost $3500 to build in 1913-1914.

Details >>


Banff School Auditorium

Near the corner of Banff Ave and Wolf Street is the location of the old school auditorium, which was constructed in 1939. The building design emulated the architectural style used by Harold Beckett in the construction of the park gates and the Park Administration Building. The Banff School of Fine Arts became the summer tenant of the building. Well after the construction of the Tunnel Mountain Campus in 1947, the Banff School of Fine Arts (now The Banff Centre) continued to hold summer classes at the auditorium. In 1972 Parks Canada acquired the building and opened its information centre.

The Friends of Banff has a Retail Store at Parks Canada Information Centre
The Information Centre Retail Store offers materials to enhance visitor’s stay in the Park, specializing in natural and cultural history books as well as trail guides and maps.

Details >>


Whyte Museum of the Canadian Rockies

To hear the podcast, click here.

Our Founders: Peter and Catharine

Far from the wild peaks of the Canadian Rockies, Catharine Robb and Peter Whyte met at the Boston Museum School of Fine Art in 1927. She was a Boston debutante. He was a member of one of Banff's pioneer families.  They married in 1930, and made Banff and the Canadian mountains their home. A studio was built one year later where they would live and paint the grandeur of their beloved mountains.

The Whytes often painted in the company of outstanding artists. Contemporaries Carl Rungius and Belmore Browne were influential with their ideas and use of colour. Catharine and Peter travelled extensively and continued to paint and draw through the 50s and 60s until Peter's death in 1966. Catharine then turned her concerns to the community, travel, skiing and conservation. Their interest in culture and understanding of philanthropy led to the development of the Whyte Museum of the Canadian Rockies, first opened in 1968. Catharine remained involved until her death in 1979.

Rays of light and swirling clouds often form the focus in Catharine's sketches. Peter constructed obscure mountain views with somber mystic hues of blues, browns and greens. Together, their life's work provides for us a sense of place.

Admission 

Museum Member: Free!
Adult $7
Student/65+ $4
Family $16
(2 Adults, 2 Children)
Children 6 and under are free
Archives & Library are free

Details >>


The Moore Residence

To hear the podcast, click here.

The Moore family built their residence in the Rocky Mountain style. Philip A. Moore, a Princeton University graduate, meet Pearl (Brewster) Moore when he became partners with her brothers in Brewster Transport, Banff's premier local transportation company. Built in 1907, their home was unlike other log houses in Banff, it came comprete with wiring, central heating and indoor plumbing. The Moore's living room housed their large collection of Stoney Indian artefacts and inherited antiques from the eastern United States. In 1971, the building was moved from its original location at the corner of Banff Avenue and Fox Street to the Whyte Museum grounds.
 

Details >>