Cultural Heritage Archive


St. Paul’s Presbyterian Church

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This church was built in 1930 of Rundlestone in the Victorian Gothic Revival architectural style and is most noted for its large stained glass image of Mount Rundle above the front door.

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Luxton Residence

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Built in 1905, this was the home of Norman and Georgina Luxton, both of whom were important figures in Banff's development, as well as friends to the Stoney Indians. Known as "Mr. Banff", Norman Luxton acquired Banff's Crag & Canyon newspaper in 1903. Some of his other enterprises included the Kind Edward Hotel, Sign of the Goat Curio Shop, and the Luxton Museum of the Plains Indian. Georgina Luxton, a member of the missionary McDougall family who worked among the Stoney Indians, is said to have been the first non-native child born in what is now Alberta. Their daughter, Eleanor Luxton, was an engineer and a noted historian and writer. The Luxton Residence, Tanglewood, and Beaver Lodge were all designated as Municipal Historic Resources in 2002.

 

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Harmony Lane

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Byron Harmon, the Alpine Club of Canada's first official photographer, bought this building in 1908. It burned down and was rebuilt in 1917 and has housed a photo studio, curio shop, tea room, bookstore, beauty parlour, theatre, library, and drugstore. Harmony Lane had Banff's first gas lighting. The front façade was extensively restored and was designated as a Municipal Historic Resource in 2001.

 

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Banff School Auditorium

Near the corner of Banff Ave and Wolf Street is the location of the old school auditorium, which was constructed in 1939. The building design emulated the architectural style used by Harold Beckett in the construction of the park gates and the Park Administration Building. The Banff School of Fine Arts became the summer tenant of the building. Well after the construction of the Tunnel Mountain Campus in 1947, the Banff School of Fine Arts (now The Banff Centre) continued to hold summer classes at the auditorium. In 1972 Parks Canada acquired the building and opened its information centre.

The Friends of Banff has a Retail Store at Parks Canada Information Centre
The Information Centre Retail Store offers materials to enhance visitor’s stay in the Park, specializing in natural and cultural history books as well as trail guides and maps.

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The Bear and The Butterfly

The Bear and The Butterfly
214 Banff Avenue | Banff, AB | T1L 1C3 | 403 762 8911
retail@friendsofbanff.com

The Bear and the Butterfly is a unique retail and interpretive centre offering Canadian gifts relating to nature.

By supporting the Friends of Banff National Park, you are helping to protect and preserve the natural and cultural heritage of Banff National Park for future generations.

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Whyte Museum of the Canadian Rockies

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Our Founders: Peter and Catharine

Far from the wild peaks of the Canadian Rockies, Catharine Robb and Peter Whyte met at the Boston Museum School of Fine Art in 1927. She was a Boston debutante. He was a member of one of Banff's pioneer families.  They married in 1930, and made Banff and the Canadian mountains their home. A studio was built one year later where they would live and paint the grandeur of their beloved mountains.

The Whytes often painted in the company of outstanding artists. Contemporaries Carl Rungius and Belmore Browne were influential with their ideas and use of colour. Catharine and Peter travelled extensively and continued to paint and draw through the 50s and 60s until Peter's death in 1966. Catharine then turned her concerns to the community, travel, skiing and conservation. Their interest in culture and understanding of philanthropy led to the development of the Whyte Museum of the Canadian Rockies, first opened in 1968. Catharine remained involved until her death in 1979.

Rays of light and swirling clouds often form the focus in Catharine's sketches. Peter constructed obscure mountain views with somber mystic hues of blues, browns and greens. Together, their life's work provides for us a sense of place.

Admission 

Museum Member: Free!
Adult $7
Student/65+ $4
Family $16
(2 Adults, 2 Children)
Children 6 and under are free
Archives & Library are free

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